Olivenza

Olivenza is a town of around 12,000 people. From 1297 until around 1801, it was part of the Kingdom of Portugal as a result of the Treaty of Alcañices. In 1801, Spain took de facto control of the town during the War of the Organes and then de iure control following the Treaty of Badajoz signed later that year. The town is still sometimes subject to claims over who owns it, Spain or Portugal, though such claims do not impact normal relations between the two countries.

History

Limbo Diverso, Fundación Triángulo Extremadura, Somos Olivenza and Extremadura Entiende collaborated with the Concejalía de Igualdad in the organizing of Orgullo 2016 Olivenza.  The program included painting sidewalk crossings the color of the rainbow, creating a mural for diversity, making t-shirts for diversity, having a workshop about inclusion and a flashmob for diversity on 28 June.  On 30 June, there was a round table on families and diversity with speakers from Fundación Triángulo, a psychologist and a lawyer.  There was no class specific programming.

Limbo Diverso and Fundación Triángulo Extremadura inagurated an exhibit in the town for Orgullo 2019 in the town that featured examples of murals from Badajoz with LGBTI references. As part of Orgullo 2020 celebrations, Olivenza inaugurated a monument celebrating LGTBI activism. The monument has a white base and a large pink triangle surrounded by rainbow-colored blocks.

See

Ayuntamiento de Olivenza, located at Plaza de la Constitución, 1, is the local town hall and government offices. On 27 May 2016, the local government in a plenary session ratified their support for the LGTBI collection through a declaration statement. The statement was put forward by Izquierda Unida, supported by PSOE and had Partido Popular abstaining. The declaration meant going forward, the rainbow flag would be raised at the townhall on 17 May in honor of the International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia, and that public education would introduce the concept of sexual diversity into its curriculum.

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