Plasencia

Plasencia is a city of nearly 40,000 inhabitants, making it the second largest city in the province. Plasencia was founded in 1186 by Rey Alfonso VIII de Castile because of its strategic military location during the Reconquista. The city has since gone on to become an important tourist destination in the region. The Universidad de Extremadura has a campus in the city.

History

Local town halls in Villanueva de la Serena, Don Benito, Vivares, Plasencia and Villanueva del Fresno made the gesture of creating rainbow pedestrian crossings in honor of Orgullo in June 2015.  This was a year where such gestures by municipal governments faced large amounts of scrutiny after the Partido Popular national led government said town halls should not fly the rainbow flag for Orgullo as it does not apply to everyone.

El Verano de Sangailè was screened on 9 November 2016 at the Sala Verdugo in Plasencia as part of the 2016 edition of FanCineGay.

Plasencia Entiende is a Facebook LGTB group for the city founded in early 2016, and has never registered as an association.  It was mostly dominated by gay men.  The references to lesbians were few and far between.  They did post information on general events in the city that were about women, but not explicitly lesbian. 

Lesbians lived in the city in 2017, and were active on social media, identifying as lesbians and seeking out activities, social events and chances for lesbian related activism.

Cáceres, Trujillo and Plasencia all created concejalías de Diversidad LGBTI in 2019 in their local townhalls following local elections that year.

As part of 2019 Lesbian Visibility Day activities, a Cáceres-Plasencia women’s football derby took place, with the goal of increasing the sexual diversity of women in sport, on 31 March.  The teams participating were Club de Fútbol Femenino Cáceres and C.P. San Miguel Femenino.

A single woman from Plasencia tried to become a mother in March 2018 using IVF. She was given a referral from her local doctor to Hospital Virgen del Puerto. After some tests were conducted, the doctor at the hospital referred her to Centro Extremeño de Reproducción Humana Asistida (CERHA) in Badajoz. She was able to go to the clinic 200 km away in August 2018, where they asked her if she was a lesbian or single woman as the doctor in Plasencia had a reputation for not treating either group and encouraged the woman to report him. After investigating to find out if this was true, she found a lesbian couple who had faced the same treatment by the gynecologist at Hospital Virgen del Puerto. She also found a straight couple who had no issues getting treatment from that gynecologist. Despite the obstacles and need to travel 200 km from her home, she was able to get pregnant after two rounds of IVF.

Plasencia played host to a traveling exhibition in the early 2020s titled, “Stories of Resistance” organized by Fundación Triángulo Extremadura in collaboration with the Agencia Extremeña de Cooperación Internacional para el Desarrollo (AEXCID). The exhibit told the stories of LGBTI people in Extremadura and the surrounding provinces fleeing persecution of homosexuality. One of the stories featured was that of a lesbian who fled El Salvador after her sexual orientation led to persecution in her local barrio near the capital.

Unidas Podemos Plasencia mentioned Lesbian Visibility Day on their Twitter account on 26 April 2021, using the hashtag #DiaVisibilidadLesbica.

There were five women from the city listed on the website Pink Cupid in March 2022.  Their ages were 20, 33, 34, 40 and 64.

Women

María José Barrantes was born in Extremadura the 1960s. Growing up in Francoist Spain, she didn’t have any lesbian references, with the whole subject being very taboo and hidden. She met her partner in the late 1980s. The two women shared a flat together and fell in love with each other, but were confused as the topic of homosexuality continued to be taboo and they were unsure of their own feelings initially because of their cultural upbringing. They kept their relationship hidden, especially since Ley de Peligrosidad Social was not fully repealed until 1995. They have been together ever since.

See

Santa Teresa de Ávila entered the city of Plasencia via Calle Mayor and Plaza Mayor via Vallodalid on 28 December 1580. While in the town on this trip, she stayed at a rented house which has since been demolished. All the main roads from the Middle Ages originate off the plaza. Every Tuesday, a market is held in the plaza; the market has been held there since the Middle Ages. Most of the current buildings in Plaza Mayor post-date Saint Teresa’s time in the city.

The Plaza de Doña Inés de Osorio is where the original Carmelite convent founded by Saint Teresa was located. The nuns have since moved, most recently on 21 January 1972, with their new convent, Monasterio de San José y de Nuestra Señora de la Calle, located at Carretera Magaz. The new convent has a small museum with objects utilized by Saint Teresa on display.

Calle Carolina Coronado is a street in the town named after Carolina Coronado, one a handful of Spanish Sapphic writers from the 19th Century. She was part of the hermandad lírica. Coronado was widely read at the time but later written out of history because she challenged patriarchal norms of the era.

Hospital Virgen del Puerto, located at Paraje Valcorchero, S/N, is a public hospital run by Servicio Extremeño de Salud. It has a fertility clinic as part of the services it offers. In 2018, a gynecologist on staff at the reproductive health clinic referred lesbians and single women to other public health facilities for IVF treatment instead of providing the service he was legally obligated to.

Ayuntamiento de Plasencia, located at Calle Rey, 4, is the local town hall and government offices.  The building was a reconstruction based on the 1523 Renaissance-style building by Juan de Álava that was built in 1966 by architect José Manuel González Valcárcel.  The town hall celebrated Orgullo on 28 June 2021 with a reading of a manifesto and hanging of a rainbow flag.

Policía Local, located on Avenida las Acacias, is the local police headquarters.  In June 2021, as part of local Orgullo celebrations, a plaque was put on the building to designate the location as a space froom of LGBTIfobia.

C.P. San Miguel Femenino are a women’s football section inside the C.P. San Miguel club in Plasencia.  The club is based at Club Polideportivo San Miguel on Calle Cristóbal Oudrid, s/n.  They support women players of all ages, from the very young to senior players.  The club was founded in 1908, and they added the women’s section in 2018.  On 31 March 2019, the senior women’s team played in a match against a women’s club side from Cáceres as part of a match to bring greater awareness to lesbians and other sexually diverse women playing sport.

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Alcuéscar, Aliseda, Almoharín, Cabezuela del Valle, Cáceres, Casar de Cáceres, Escurial, Hervás, Jaraíz de la Vera, Jarandilla de la Vera, Logrosán, Malpartida de Cáceres, Miajadas, Navaconcejo, Navalmoral de la Mata, Pizarro, Plasencia, Torrejoncillo, Trujillo, Valencia de Alcántara

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