Torrejón de Ardoz

Torrejón de Ardoz is an important city in the region, serving as the home of the European Union agency European Union Satellite Centre (SatCen) and the home of the Spanish space agency, Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA).  The town, located 568 meters above sea level, was first settled in the 12th century.  It currently has a population of around 130,000 people.

See

Calle Rosa Chacel is a street located in the town. It is named after the writer Rosa Chacel, who was born in Valladolid on 3 June 1898. A member of the Generación del 27, she would write her autobiography Acrópolis which discussed being a lesbian in Spain in the 1920s.

Estadio Las Veredillas, located at Calle Turín, 12, is the home grounds for AD Torrejón CF Femenino. The team was formed in 1996 as Torrejón CF and merged with AD Torrejón in 2002. Their stadium holds 500 spectators. Lesbians who have played for the team include Laura del Río.

Avenida de Carmen Laforet is a street located in the town named after the writer Carmen Laforet. Laforet was an important writer contributing to the body of lesbian literary canon during and after the Franco era. While her sexuality is unknown, she had a deep and personal relationship with tennis player Lilí Álvarez and maintained a social circle that included many known and suspected lesbians. Her 1945 Nadal prize winning novel Nada is considered a piece of class Spanish literature.

Parque de Carmen Laforet is a park located at Calle Vial 10, 2V. It is named after the writer Carmen Laforet, an important writer contributing to the body of lesbian literary canon during and after the Franco era. While her sexuality is unknown, she had a deep and personal relationship with tennis player Lilí Álvarez and maintained a social circle that included many known and suspected lesbians. Her 1945 Nadal prize winning novel Nada is considered a piece of class Spanish writing.

Calle de Gloria Fuertes is a street in the town named in honor of Gloria Fuertes. Fuertes was a poet and member of the Generación del 50, the first post-war generation of Spanish writers. She was a lesbian and feminist, and an important one in Francoist Spain at a time when the regime demanded conformity to strict ideological gender roles.